killbenedictcumberbatch:

A black boy gets murdered and his community stands up for him and are attacked by police for over 2 months and are deemed animals and violent rioters

white people set cars on fire over some damn pumpkins and get called “rowdy” aint that some shit

(via kindofcomplicated)

infamousnspooky:

first “basic is a misogynistic slur against women” now “fuckboy is a slur against trans and gay men” yall just need to admit you hate black people and stop trying to warp our slang to make it seem like we hate everyone

(via kindofcomplicated)

Because I can tell you for a fact, I know many black women who are loud and ratchet and wear weaves. I know black women who are attending law school and choose to wear their hair naturally. I know black women who are single mothers, working multiple jobs in order to support their families. I know black women who are shy and introverted and listen to alternative music. I know Claire Huxtables and Olivia Popes. I know Nene Leakes and Sweet Browns. And the one thing that they all have in common is that they all deserved to be loved.

yagazieemezi:

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. “It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be.”

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself." (keep reading)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

(via kindofcomplicated)

mia-redworth:

How can people see Emma Watson being verbally attacked online and threatened with hacked nudes being released by men because of her speech on gender equality and still think we don’t need feminism. It’s not women who make men out to be some evil creatures, you guys do that well enough on your own.

(via designmyownworld)